Perhaps your client stopped working with you because of budget shifts or a new direction – or maybe it was something simple like the project end.  However, your old clients are a largely untapped resource for new revenue. It costs significantly more to court and bring aboard a new client than it does to revive an old one.

Have your Virtual Assistant draft the emails & carve 20 minutes out of your schedule to do some follow-up. It’s astonishing how much the landscape of sales has changed in the last few years – and how relationship-building is still at the top of the list. Reaching out personally to an old client can make a huge impact. It will gain exposure on your and your services — plus you have the opportunity to check in and see what’s new and exciting for someone you once worked closely alongside.

Here are three simple steps to make that potentially awkward exchange less painful and potentially fruitful:

  1. Acknowledge the lapse in time
  2. Explain the “Why now?”
  3. Make an offer

Acknowledge the Lapse in Time

Don’t be disingenuous. Recognize and acknowledge the amount of time that passed with a little bit of rationale or context. Perhaps you were doing something that would benefit the client, like expanding your service offerings or firming up systems. (Frankly, if you’ve simply been disorganized, be honest and apologize for not being in touch, but let them know they’ve been on your mind.)

Explain the “Why Now?”

Presumably, the client will know that yo may have an agenda – you want to reconnect for the opportunity to work together again. Prior to jumping in for the kill, make sure you’re genuinely interested in what they’ve been up to. Ask questions and be specific. Then, tell the client what prompted you to get in touch.

Make an offer

Have good manners and throw in an offer, graciously and generously. You’re much more likely to get a response when you acknowledge the client for your work together and offer some type of special savings should they chose to jump back into work with you.